Blog

Apr 23, 2017

Updated Nov 6, 2017

My readers should know that I'm a Roman Catholic Christian with an open mind.  I approach faith & spituality seriously--without bias; and with very high regard for its importance on this planet, and beyond.   

I think the Protestant and Catholic Reformations were in the end, good movements in history, except for the inhuman slaughter throughout Europe that raged for years as a result of Christians murdering one another, inspired by Monarchs who incited the hatred, hanging, drawing and quartering of priests and abbots--who had served their faithful innocents well, for ages--then having completed those atrocities on Catholic clergy, established a series of state churches to enhance their power over people, and to expand their domains.   

In my opinion, the bloodshead was the most tragic of paradoxes and the ultimate atrocity among many in the real history I present throughout the trilogy; however, like many events over the span of my narrative, including the destiny of Native Americans, and later, the Hawaiians whose queen was overthrown by the sons of missionaries that had come to "save the natives"--it eventually produced certain outcomes that continued the advance of the Western World's civilization: with a revised Roman Catholic Bible, the works of John Locke and Adam Smith; the immigration of English Protestants with a history of common law; and the birth and subsequent education of our Founding Fathers who created a unique experiment in government from thirteen British Colonies.  

The United States of America rose rapidly from those British Colonies following the War of Independence; and retained a unique cultural, philosophical and theological bond with Great Britain that saved the modern world from tyranny three times in the 20th Century.

Even Pierre (Peter), a Roman Catholic from Normandy, and first Audrain to pursue the American Dream in 1740, had children and grand-children who became members of Protestant denominations in America--and for many generations, served our nation with Christian virtue and bravery in a number perilous eras on the way to America's new millenium.    

I too began to dream about all the real people, who followed their dreams; especially those--regardless of the faith, race or ethnicity--who sacrificed everything for the sake of those dreams and the ideas they conceived to make them a reality.

 

Frank Audrain, Author
Frank Audrain
Author
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